RYERSON UNIVERSITY

Course Outline (F2019)

COE700: Engineering Design

Instructor(s)Alagan Anpalagan [Coordinator]
Office: ENG447
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 6079
Email: alagan@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: TBA

Balasubramanian Venkatesh
Office: CUI233
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 544537
Email: bala@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: TBA

Truman Yang
Office: ENG435
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 4175
Email: cungang@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: TBA

David Xu
Office: ENG320
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 6075
Email: dxu@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: Monday 2-5PM

Ebrahim Bagheri
Office: ENG316
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 7953
Email: bagheri@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: TBA

Farah Mohammadi
Office: ENG461
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 6094
Email: fmohamma@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: TBD

Fei Yuan
Office: ENG 433
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 6100
Email: fyuan@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: Mon.12-2 pm., Wed.10-12

Gul Khan
Office: ENG448
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 6084
Email: gnkhan@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: Thursday 12:10-2:00PM

Naimul Mefraz Khan
Office: ENG438
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 6479
Email: n77khan@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: Wedensdays 3-4 PM

Reza Sedaghat
Office: ENG431
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 6083
Email: rsedagha@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: TBA

Richard Cheung
Office: ENG330
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 6112
Email: cheung@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: TBA

Nagi Mekhiel
Office: ENG446
Phone: (416) 979-5000 x 7251
Email: nmekhiel@ryerson.ca
Office Hours: Th 12-2

Calendar Description This one term course has two objectives. (1) The lectures provide students with advice on design, project management, reliability, practical advice on software, circuits and components and the documentation of their work. The lectures are organized as a seminar series presented by the faculty lab coordinators and practicing engineering professionals. The seminar series' goal is to provide students with knowledge that will assist them with project design and implementation. (2) The laboratory component of the course provides students with an opportunity to select a project to be completed in the Winter semester course COE 800 Design Project. Students search information, design and source components in consultation with the faculty lab coordinators who will supervise their projects in the Winter term. Project topics are provided from which students select a topic. Students are also encouraged to submit their own topics for approval.
PrerequisitesCOE 628, COE 608, COE 528, ELE 635, ELE 639, MEC 511 and (ELE 504 or ELE 632)
Antirequisites

None

Corerequisites

None

Compulsory Text(s):
  1. Teamwork and Project Management, K. Smith, 3 rd edition, McGraw Hill, 2004.
Reference Text(s):
  1. Design Concepts for Engineers, M. Horenstein, 3 rd edition, Prentice Hall, 2006.
  2. Engineering Design, R. Eggert, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2005.
  3. Fundamentals of Engineering Design, B. Hyman, Prentice Hall, 2003.
  4. Design for Electrical and Computer Engineers, J. Salt and R. Rothery, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2002.
Learning Objectives (Indicators)  

At the end of this course, the successful student will be able to:

  1. Develop students' ability and technical skills to make decisions in engineering designs using judgment in solving problems with uncertainty and imprecise information, and selecting optimal choice among alternatives applying known constraints identified in the project definition. (2a)
  2. Predict user needs, define design parameters, and identify constraints in the process of defining Engineering Design Project (EDP). (4b), (4a)
  3. Develop students' ability and technical skills to make decisions in engineering designs using judgment in solving problems with uncertainty and imprecise information, and selecting optimal choice among alternatives applying known constraints identified in the project definition. (4c)
  4. Train students with project management and teamwork skills, which includes leadership, organization, planning, motivation, conflict resolution, design process management, cooperation and contribution, decomposing project into key tasks, determining tasks interrelationship, and managing project to meet budget and time line. (6b), (6a), (11b)
  5. Demonstrates written and oral communication skill through the ability of constructing effective arguments and drawing conclusions using evidence in discussing design choices, using technical vocabulary, and presenting information clearly and concisely. (7a), (7b)
  6. Build up students' creative thinking and capabilities of conducting research/interconnecting various engineering knowledge to formation of realistic designs. Recognize the need for self-education and developing relationships with experts in the field. (12b)

NOTE:Numbers in parentheses refer to the graduate attributes required by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB).

Course Organization

1.0 hours of lecture per week for 13 weeks
1.0 hours of lab/tutorial per week for 12 weeks

Teaching AssistantsTBA
Course Evaluation
Theory
Design Process and Project Management Exam 25 %
Seminars Attendances and Quizzes 10 %
Final Written Report summarizing design activities 30 %
Laboratory
Milestones and Milestone Compliance Reports 15 %
Project Oral Exam 20 %
TOTAL:100 %

Note: In order for a student to pass a course with "Theory and Laboratory" components, in addition to earning a minimum overall course mark of 50%, the student must pass the Laboratory and Theory portions separately by achieving a minimum of 50% in the combined Laboratory components and 50% in the combined Theory components. Please refer to the "Course Evaluation" section for details on the Theory and Laboratory components.


ExaminationsCourse evaluation will be based on students' performance and design reports.
  
 *Note: Each project group consists of 4 students. Each student will be evaluated both individually and as a group.
  
 Examination on “Design Process and Project Management” is carried out in Week 6 (tentative).
  
 Students must attend specified seminars (& quizzes) in weeks 7-11 and submit project milestones (Week 3) and milestones compliance reports (weeks 5, 7, 9, and 11) to their FLC for evaluation prior to meeting with their FLCs.
  
 The final written reports will be assessed not only on their technical merit, but also on the communication skills of their author as exhibited through the reports. The written report will be evaluated as follows:
  
 (i) Introduction and Objective   
 -Statement of the problem, clarification of need and requirements
  
 (ii) Approach and Methods     
 -Relevant literature review, use of suitable engineering concepts and methods     -Alternative design approaches examined and analyzed
  
 (iii) Design Analysis & Synthesis      
 -Design specifications, challenges and methodology      
 -Use of modern concepts and methods for data gathering, analysis, and synthesis      -Charts on the design process
  
 (iv) Technical Writing and General Organization    
 -English, spelling, conciseness, clarity, cover page, index, sequence of chapters, references, appendices, overall adequacy, and integration of the report
  
 Project Design Oral Exam – Weeks 12/13
 Final Report Submission – Week 13
 
Other Evaluation InformationN/A
Other InformationApproved Project List
 ----------------------------
 In order to assist students in selecting a suitable project, a list of EDP Topics is posted on the Departmental EDP website (http://www.ee.ryerson.ca/capstone/). All topics are 4-student projects. The website description contains a preamble that gives an overview of the project and explains why it is of interest. Partial specifications, objectives, and suggested approach are included.
  
 *Note: COE students can only choose project topics from COE700 approved list of projects.
  
 Once the EDP topics are posted on the website, students can contact the professors teaching this course termed the Faculty Lab Coordinators (FLCs) to discuss their project topics available for student selection and the design challenges for those projects. If a student(s) wishes to propose (or) modify a topic, the student should first choose the topic(s) closest to their likes from the approved list of COE EDP topics and go through the COE EDP topic selection process. Once they are assigned a topic by the computer selection process, they can then discuss with their assigned FLC to modify their topics subjected to the approval of their respective FLCs.
  
 Course Organization Details
 ------------------------------------
 In Week 3 (tentative) lecture hour, a seminar on “Design Process and Project Management” is scheduled.
  
  During Week 2, students must select their project topics online using our Department’s computers. The actual dates of the computer topic selection and the procedure will be announced. If more than one group of students selects a particular project topic, the approval of the selection is based on a random process; those who do not get the approval will re-select another topic.
  
  Once topics are assigned to the groups, the students will start the design activities and meet with their FLCs regularly the following weeks of the course. During the weeks when in-class seminars/quizzes/exams are scheduled, it is students responsibility to discuss with their FLCs ahead of time and identify alternate meeting times.
  
  In Week 6 (tentative) lecture hours, students must do an examination (25% of total course grade) on the subject of Design Process and Project Management. During Weeks 7 to 11, students attend seminars* (that will be announced on the course D2L web site) and/or carry out design work in a specific location or laboratory and report to their designated FLC. Seminars may be teamtaught by the guest speakers or FLCs. These seminars will be scheduled and announced on the course D2L website.
  
 *Note: Weeks 7-11 are tentatively planned for seminars/quizzes, the actual weeks will be announced subjected to the availability of the guest speakers.
  
  During Weeks 12/13, students must do their Oral Exam with their designated FLCs and submit their Final Report in Week 13.
  
 Project Cost Equipment, and Laboratories
 ---------------------------------------------------
 Project costs for components and other supplies will be borne by the students. Some specialized components may be provided by the Department. This will be noted in the project description. Students should carefully assess the cost implications of a particular project before making a commitment. Requests for equipment or laboratory usage outside of your scheduled lab hours should be directed to your FLC.
  
 Roles of a FLC and FA
 ---------------------------
 This course presents administrators with a major challenge in coordination. Laboratory resources must be managed to ensure their adequacy, longevity, student safety, and security. Students are to be placed with a FLC who can advise them.
  
 Role of Faculty Laboratory Coordinator (FLC)
  
  1. Ensure that adequate design components meeting the expectation of COE EDP is in each project under their supervision.
  
  2. Provide, where feasible, technical and project management advice without unduly removing the challenge from the student.
  
  3. Advise the student, where necessary and possible, in the acquisition of parts, test equipment, and specialized laboratory facilities, as required.
  
  4. Monitor the student's weekly progress.
  
  5. Evaluate the performance of the students (individually and as a group) as per the course evaluation.
  
 Role of Faculty Advisor (FA)
  
  The FA is a faculty member who has voluntarily suggested a project or is formally or informally advising the student. When a FA generates a project, the FA is acknowledged in the Engineering Design description. A FA may or may not be interested in assisting the student beyond the project generation phase. As a courtesy, the student should always discuss the project with the FA when one exists and establish the nature and extent of any advice the FA wishes to provide. Upon project completion, in the Winter Term, it is suggested that the student provide an Engineering Design report copy to the FA if the advisor so wishes. This copy does not have to be bound.
  
 Scope of EDP
 -----------------
 The project component COE 700 will make significant demands on the student's time. The key to completing all aspects of this course is to carefully define reasonable limits to what is being undertaken and to budget time on a regular basis to minimize last minute rushes. Two-hour lab sessions per week are assigned in Week 7 to 13. In these lab sessions, the student has the chance to discuss challenges that arise and log their progress in their project with their FLC. As stated earlier, the intended value of the engineering design project is to provide a major experience in engineering design. Therefore, it is important that the project is thoroughly researched and well under way in COE 700 during the Fall Term and a plan of actions for the Winter Term course COE 800 is carefully drawn up. Your FLC may refuse to assist the student who has not made a reasonable effort to solve their problem.
  
 Ultimately, the successful completion of the project is the sole responsibility of the student.

Course Content

Week

Hours

Chapters /
Section

Topic, description

1-13

Engineering Capstone Design


Laboratory/Tutorials/Activity Schedule

Week

Lab

Description

1

-

Presenters/Evaluators: EDP Coordinator, FLCs, Staff
 Activities: Course Management, EDP Topics
 

2

-

Presenters/Evaluators: EDP Coordinator, FLCs, Staff
 Activities: Computer Selection of EDP Topics, Lab Safety, Begin Meetings with FLCs
 

3

-

Presenters/Evaluators: EDP Coordinator, FLCs, PM Faculty
 Activities: Design Process and Project Management Seminar/ FLCs Meetings and Design Activities/ Project Milestone Submission
 

4

-

Presenters/Evaluators: FLCs
 Activities: FLCs Meetings and Design Activities
 

5

-

Presenters/Evaluators: FLCs Activities: FLCs Meetings and Design
 Activities/ Milestone Compliance Report (St1)

6

-

Presenters/Evaluators: EDP Coordinator, FLCs
 Activities: Design Process and Project Management Exam/ FLCs Meetings and Design Activities
 

7

-

Presenters/Evaluators: Guest Speakers, EDP Coordinator,FLCs
 Activities: Seminar*/ FLCs Meetings and Design Activities/ Milestone Compliance Report (St2).
 
 *Note: Weeks 7-11 are tentatively planned for seminars/quizzes, the actual weeks will be announced subjected to the availability of the guest speakers.

8

-

Presenters/Evaluators: Guest Speakers, EDP Coordinator,FLCs
 Activities: Seminar/ FLCs Meetings and Design Activities
 

9

-

Presenters/Evaluators: Guest Speakers, EDP Coordinator,FLCs
 Activities: Seminar/ FLCs Meetings and Design Activities/ Milestone Compliance Report (St3)
 

10

-

Presenters/Evaluators: Guest Speakers, EDP Coordinator,FLCs
 Activities: Seminar/ FLCs Meetings and Design Activities
 

11

-

Presenters/Evaluators: Guest Speakers, EDP Coordinator,FLCs
 Activities: Seminar/ FLCs Meetings and Design Activities/ Milestone Compliance Report (St4)
 

12

-

Presenters/Evaluators: FLCs
 Activities: Project Design Oral Exam
 

13

-

Presenters/Evaluators: FLCs
 Activities: Project Design Oral Exam/ Final Report Submission/ Submission of COE 800 plan for all 4 phases
 

Policies & Important Information:

  1. Students are required to obtain and maintain a Ryerson e-mail account for timely communications between the instructor and the students;
  2. Any changes in the course outline, test dates, marking or evaluation will be discussed in class prior to being implemented;
  3. Assignments, projects, reports and other deadline-bound course assessment components handed in past the due date will receive a mark of ZERO, unless otherwise stated. Marking information will be made available at the time when such course assessment components are announced.
  4. Refer to our Departmental FAQ page for information on common questions and issues at the following link: https://www.ee.ryerson.ca/guides/Student.Academic.FAQ.html.

Missed Classes and/or Evaluations

When possible, students are required to inform their instructors of any situation which arises during the semester which may have an adverse effect upon their academic performance, and must request any consideration and accommodation according to the relevant policies as far in advance as possible. Failure to do so may jeopardize any academic appeals.

  1. Health certificates - If a student misses the deadline for submitting an assignment, or the date of an exam or other evaluation component for health reasons, they should notify their instructor as soon as possible, and submit a Ryerson Student Health Certificate AND an Academic Consideration Request form within 3 working days of the missed date. Both documents are available at https://www.ryerson.ca/senate/forms/medical.pdf.. If you are a full-time or part-time degree student, then you submit your forms to your own program department or school;
  2. Religious, Aboriginal and Spiritual observance - If a student needs accommodation because of religious, Aboriginal or spiritual observance, they must submit a Request for Accommodation of Student Religious, Aboriginal and Spiritual Observance AND an Academic Consideration Request form within the first 2 weeks of the class or, for a final examination, within 2 weeks of the posting of the examination schedule. If the requested absence occurs within the first 2 weeks of classes, or the dates are not known well in advance as they are linked to other conditions, these forms should be submitted with as much lead time as possible in advance of the absence. Both documents are available at www.ryerson.ca/senate/forms/relobservforminstr.pdf. If you are a full-time or part-time degree student, then you submit the forms to your own program department or school;
  3. Academic Accommodation Support - Before the first graded work is due, students registered with the Academic Accommodation Support office (AAS - www.ryerson.ca/studentlearningsupport/academic-accommodation-support) should provide their instructors with an Academic Accommodation letter that describes their academic accommodation plan.

Academic Integrity

Ryerson's Policy 60 (the Academic Integrity policy) applies to all students at the University. Forms of academic misconduct include plagiarism, cheating, supplying false information to the University, and other acts. The most common form of academic misconduct is plagiarism - a serious academic offence, with potentially severe penalties and other consequences. It is expected, therefore, that all examinations and work submitted for evaluation and course credit will be the product of each student's individual effort (or an authorized group of students). Submitting the same work for credit to more than one course, without instructor approval, can also be considered a form of plagiarism.

Suspicions of academic misconduct may be referred to the Academic Integrity Office (AIO). Students who are found to have committed academic misconduct will have a Disciplinary Notation (DN) placed on their academic record (not on their transcript) and will normally be assigned one or more of the following penalties:

  1. A grade reduction for the work, ranging up to an including a zero on the work (minimum penalty for graduate work is a zero on the work);
  2. A grade reduction in the course greater than a zero on the work. (Note that this penalty can only be applied to course components worth 10% or less, and any additional penalty cannot exceed 10% of the final course grade. Students must be given prior notice that such a penalty will be assigned (e.g. in the course outline or on the assignment handout);
  3. An F in the course;
  4. More serious penalties up to and including expulsion from the University.

The unauthorized use of intellectual property of others, including your professor, for distribution, sale, or profit is expressly prohibited, in accordance with Policy 60 (Sections 2.8 and 2.10). Intellectual property includes, but is not limited to:

  1. Slides
  2. Lecture notes
  3. Presentation materials used in and outside of class
  4. Lab manuals
  5. Course packs
  6. Exams

For more detailed information on these issues, please refer to the Academic Integrity policy(https://www.ryerson.ca/senate/policies/pol60.pdf) and to the Academic Integrity Office website (https://www.ryerson.ca/academicintegrity/).

Important Resources Available at Ryerson

  1. The Library (https://library.ryerson.ca/) provides research workshops and individual assistance. Inquire at the Reference Desk on the second floor of the library, or go to library.ryerson.ca/guides/workshops
  2. Student Learning Support(https://www.ryerson.ca/studentlearningsupport) offers group-based and individual help with writing, math, study skills and transition support, and other issues.