IEEE Ryerson IoT for SmartCities Hackathon


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IEEE Ryerson presents IOT for Smart Cities Hackathon. It is a 24 hour hackathon happening on March 24th. Attendees can join as a team of 3 or we can place you in a team. It’s an open Hackathon, so anyone from any department and any institution can attend; doesn't matter about your skill level and experience. Teams will present their final projects in front of a panel of judges for a chance to win prize money and an exciting opportunity to network with variety of industry personnel. Materials will be provided on the day of the hackathon.

1st Place: $750

2nd Place: $500

3rd Place: $250

Hackathon Sign Up Page


IEEE Ryerson Electronics Chapter

Welcome to Ryerson's Electronics Chapter! Discover a community that is creating, developing, integrating, sharing, and applying knowledge about electrical and computer technologies and sciences.


ABOUT US
Engineering encompasses a passion to create the wealth in our society that connects us. The childish curiosity to push past our limits of knowledge challenges us. Ryerson Electronics Chapter creates a community inspiring us to have fun leveraging the theory from the lecture hall into DIY electronics projects.

REC is dedicated to promoting the engineering process of creating, developing, integrating, sharing, and applying knowledge about electrical and computer applications.

Weekly Drop-In workshops are designed to challenge participants of all skill levels, utilizing Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Github, Electronics, Signals, Embedded Programming, design and much more! As an attendee, you can expect to leave each workshop with a new and improved skill set.


"Let’s reignite the spark in learning!"





WORKSHOPS





Fall Semester

Workshop 1: Introduction to Arduino and Electronics


Objective: Introduce members to the basic fundamentals of Arduino and its applications.

Description: Executive members gave a brief summary of different kinds of electronic parts that will be used from there on in the following workshops and then students were asked to create a traffic light system using the Arduino, a few LEDs, pushbuttons and a few other electronic components. Take a look below if you want to give it a go yourself!

Sources for DIY:

Arduino
Electronics
Code for Traffic Lights with or without Push Buttons
Circuit Schematic



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Weekly Recap:



Workshop 2 & 3: Sense the Trigger


Objective: Teach members the theory and application of photo sensors and ultrasonic sensors.

Description: Asked to measure the distance of an object placed away from the sensor using the ultrasonic sensors and Arduino. Resources used during the workshop are given below for you to try out at home!

Sources for DIY:

Arduino
BJT
pulsein()
HC-SR04 Link 1 and HC-SR04 Link 2
Code for measuring distance and much more (Part 1) and (Part 2)
Circuit Schematic

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Weekly Recap:



Workshop 4: Implementing Photoresistors and Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT)


Objective: Introduce and teach members the theory and applications of photoresistors and transistors, more specifically Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs).

Description: Asked students to utilize the BJTs and photoresistors to move the Arduino left or right. Check out the links below if you want to try it out yourself!

Sources for DIY:

Arduino
BJT
Photoresistors
Analog Input Sample Code



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Weekly Recap:



Workshop 5: Implementing DC Motors 1.0


Objective: Familiarize members with the basic fundamentals of DC Motors and their applications and also to introduce H-Bridge Circuits and the concept of Pulse Width Modulation (PWM).

Description: Asked students to build their own H-Bridge and by utilizing pulse width modulation (PWM) within the Arduino microcontroller to try and change the direction and the speed of the DC Motor. Check out the links below if you want to try it out yourself!

Sources for DIY:

Arduino
DC Motors
H-Bridge
PWM
How a DC Motor Works?
DC Motors and Universal Motors
DC Motor Speed Control using H-Bridge
Circuitry (Use these components instead, Resistors: 4 x 330 Ohm, Transistors: 4 x 2N3904)
DC Motor Speed Control Code



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Weekly Recap:



Workshop 6: Implementing DC Motors 2.0


Objective: Continue teaching about DC Motors and ultimately get the H-Bridge to work with the DC Motor.

Description: Continued to build the newly designed H-Bridges and utilized them to change the direction of the rotation of the DC Motor. Check out the links below to try it out yourself!

Sources for DIY:

Arduino
DC Motors
H-Bridge
PWM
DC Motor Speed Control using H-Bridge
Controlling DC Motors using Arduino and H-Bridge
Circuitry (Use these components instead, Resistors: 4 x 330 Ohm, Transistors: 4 x 2N3904)
DC Motor Speed Control Code



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Weekly Recap:



Workshop 7: Integrating Arduino with PWM and H-Bridge


Objective: Implement the concept of Pulse-Width Modulation and change the direction of rotation of the DC Motor.

Description: Reviewed H-Bridges and PWM and rebuilt the H-Bridge from the last workshop and integrated it with the Arduino. Take a look below if you want to try this out for yourself!

Sources for DIY:

Arduino
DC Motors
H-Bridge
PWM
DC Motor Speed Control using H-Bridge
Controlling DC Motors using Arduino and H-Bridge
Circuitry (Use these components instead, Resistors: 4 x 330 Ohm, Transistors: 4 x 2N3904)
DC Motor Speed Control Code



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Weekly Recap:



Workshop 8: Critique Session and Future Plans


Objective: Hear out our members and see what they thought were some pros and cons about our weekly workshops.

Description: This workshop was a self led, open-ended discussion. A chart with sticky notes was created which consisted of feedback from the members of the workshop and with possible workshop ideas for the future.


Winter Semester (IEEE Certification Series Workshops)

Workshop 1: Introduction to Accelerometers


Objective: Introduce the theoretical concepts of dual-axis accelerometers (Memsic 2125 Accelerometer) and as well as its application using Arduino.

Description: Members were asked to turn LEDs on and off based off of the direction that the accelerometer was tilted.

Sources for DIY:

Arduino
What is an Accelerometer?
MEMSIC 2125
Circuitry
Code



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Weekly Recap:



Workshop 2: Introduction to Motor Shields


Objective: Review the concepts of DC Motors and introduce the theory and application of Motor Shields.

Description: Members were asked to move their ebots forward, backward, left and right.

Sources for DIY:

Arduino
What is a Motor Shield?
RB-Dfr-151 Motor Shield
Code



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DIY Projects

Interesting Projects by Members


Member: LUIS RESTREPO


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Check out one of our very own member's cool projects by following his youtube channel below:

Point Maximum (Youtube Channel)
Cool Automatic Fan
Neat Tricks with BJTs












OUR TEAM


Bipin

Bipin Aasi

Chair

Bipin is a 3rd year Biomedical Engineering student. His research interests are where Quantum Mechanics and Biomedical Engineering converge. This includes Radiation Therapy Devices, Image Analysis and Tissue Engineering. In his free time, Bipin loves to take on personal projects, his most recent being an EEG! His goal is to bring a sense of community within Ryerson FEAS, empowering and inspiring students so they can all explore self directed learning through different lenses.

Fun Facts: He loves running, taking landscape photography, and KitKat!




Shahezad

Shahezad Kassam

Chief Technical Officer

Shahezad Kassam is a 3rd year Electrical Engineering student at Ryerson University. Typically working with Arduino, he creates and designs do-it-yourself projects with the microcontroller. In his free time, he enjoys sleep, playing games and just generally being a proud nerd.


Reaz

Reaz Ahmed Sabbir

Vice Chair

Reaz Sabbir is a 4th year electrical engineering student. He is extremely passionate about electronics and competitive programming.

Fun Fact: He is the smartest one in the group.





Krieshan

Krieshan Sivabalan

Web Administrator

Krieshan is a 3rd year Computer Engineering Student at Ryerson University. His main interest in his field of study is Digital and Software Systems. He loves to play sports and play video games in his free time.

Fun Facts: His favorite sport is soccer and pizza is his number one go-to food.




Justin

Justin MacPherson

Chief Operational Officer

Justin is a 4th year electrical engineering returning from my IIP where he was employed as a layout designer. His work there included designing analog and digital layouts for GPUs and CPUs. He enjoys playing around with microcontrollers, so if you have any questions about microcontrollers or electronics in general feel free to approach him. He would also love to help anyone out who is stuck on a personal electronics project.





Dhyey

Dhyey Patel

Academic Enhancement Officer

Dhyey is an Electrical Engineering student at Ryerson University currently on his PEY. He seeks to research/ work on the engineering aspects of computer architecture, power systems/ electronics and vehicular technology especially electric vehicles. He develops projects and ideas for students to work on ensuring that the workshops are challenging everyone to further develop their skills. He is very passionate about what he studies, and loves meeting new people.

Fun Facts: Dhyey loves cars, bikes and going out on adventures to explore natural locations



GALLERY

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